Stemming from de Finetti’s work on finitely additive coherent probabilities, the paradigm of coherence has been applied to many uncertainty calculi in order to remove structural restrictions on the domain of the assessment. Three possible approaches to coherence are available: coherence as a consistency notion, coherence as fair betting scheme, and coherence in terms of penalty criterion. Due to its intimate connection with (finitely additive) probability theory, Dempster-Shafer theory allows notions of coherence in all the forms recalled above, presenting evident similarities with probability theory. In this chapter we present a systematic study of such coherence notions showing their equivalence.

How to Assess Coherent Beliefs: A Comparison of Different Notions of Coherence in Dempster-Shafer Theory of Evidence

Petturiti, Davide
;
Vantaggi, Barbara
2022-01-01

Abstract

Stemming from de Finetti’s work on finitely additive coherent probabilities, the paradigm of coherence has been applied to many uncertainty calculi in order to remove structural restrictions on the domain of the assessment. Three possible approaches to coherence are available: coherence as a consistency notion, coherence as fair betting scheme, and coherence in terms of penalty criterion. Due to its intimate connection with (finitely additive) probability theory, Dempster-Shafer theory allows notions of coherence in all the forms recalled above, presenting evident similarities with probability theory. In this chapter we present a systematic study of such coherence notions showing their equivalence.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11391/1538854
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