Ghrelin is a novel enteric hormone that stimulates growth hormone (GH), ACTH, and epinephrine; augments plasma glucose; and increases food intake by inducing the feeling of hunger. These characteristics make ghrelin a potential counterregulatory hormone. At present, it is not known whether ghrelin increases in response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia. To answer this question, we compared plasma ghrelin concentrations after a short-term insulin infusion that was allowed or not (euglycemic clamp) to cause hypoglycemia (2.7 ± 0.2 mmol/l at 30 min) in five healthy volunteers. In both studies, plasma ghrelin concentrations decreased (P < 0.01) after insulin infusion (hypoglycemia by 14%, euglycemia by 22%), reached a nadir at 30 min, and returned to baseline at 60 min, without differences between the hypoglycemia and the euglycemia studies. Glucagon, cortisol, and GH increased in response to hypoglycemia despite the decreased ghrelin. There was a strong correlation (R2 = 0.91, P < 0.002) between the insulin sensitivity of the subjects and the percentage suppression of ghrelin from baseline. These data demonstrate that ghrelin is not required for the hormonal defenses against insulin-induced hypoglycemia and that insulin can suppress ghrelin levels in healthy humans. These results raise the possibility that postprandial hyperinsulinemia is responsible for the reduction of plasma ghrelin that occurs during meal intake.

Ghrelin is not necessary for adequate hormonal counterregulation of insulin-induced hypoglycemia

LUCIDI, Paola;FANELLI, Carmine Giuseppe;SANTEUSANIO, Fausto;BOLLI, Geremia Brunetto;DE FEO, Pierpaolo
2002

Abstract

Ghrelin is a novel enteric hormone that stimulates growth hormone (GH), ACTH, and epinephrine; augments plasma glucose; and increases food intake by inducing the feeling of hunger. These characteristics make ghrelin a potential counterregulatory hormone. At present, it is not known whether ghrelin increases in response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia. To answer this question, we compared plasma ghrelin concentrations after a short-term insulin infusion that was allowed or not (euglycemic clamp) to cause hypoglycemia (2.7 ± 0.2 mmol/l at 30 min) in five healthy volunteers. In both studies, plasma ghrelin concentrations decreased (P < 0.01) after insulin infusion (hypoglycemia by 14%, euglycemia by 22%), reached a nadir at 30 min, and returned to baseline at 60 min, without differences between the hypoglycemia and the euglycemia studies. Glucagon, cortisol, and GH increased in response to hypoglycemia despite the decreased ghrelin. There was a strong correlation (R2 = 0.91, P < 0.002) between the insulin sensitivity of the subjects and the percentage suppression of ghrelin from baseline. These data demonstrate that ghrelin is not required for the hormonal defenses against insulin-induced hypoglycemia and that insulin can suppress ghrelin levels in healthy humans. These results raise the possibility that postprandial hyperinsulinemia is responsible for the reduction of plasma ghrelin that occurs during meal intake.
2002
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11391/1039317
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