Cerebral malaria (CM) is the major lethal complication of Plasmodium falciparum infection. It is characterized by persistent coma along with symmetrical motor signs. Several clinical, histopathological, and laboratory studies have suggested that cytoadherence of parasitized erythrocytes, neural injury by malarial toxin, and excessive inflammatory cytokine production are possible pathogenic mechanisms. Although the detailed pathophysiology of CM remains unsolved, it is thought that the binding of parasitized erythrocytes to the cerebral endothelia of microvessels, leading to their occlusion and the consequent angiogenic dysregulation play a key role in the disease pathogenesis. Recent evidences showed that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor-related molecules are over-expressed in the brain tissues of CM patients, as well as increased levels of VEGF are detectable in biologic samples from malaria patients. Whether the modulation of VEGF is causative agent of CM mortality or a specific phenotype of patients with susceptibility to fatal CM needs further evaluation. Currently, there is no biological test available to confirm the diagnosis of CM and its complications. It is hoped that development of biomarkers to identify patients and potential risk for adverse outcomes would greatly enhance better intervention and clinical management to improve the outcomes. We review and discuss here what it is currently known in regard to the role of VEGF in CM as well as VEGF as a potential biomarker.

Protective or pathogenic effects of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) as potential biomarker in cerebral malaria.

CANAVESE, MIRIAM;SPACCAPELO, Roberta
2014

Abstract

Cerebral malaria (CM) is the major lethal complication of Plasmodium falciparum infection. It is characterized by persistent coma along with symmetrical motor signs. Several clinical, histopathological, and laboratory studies have suggested that cytoadherence of parasitized erythrocytes, neural injury by malarial toxin, and excessive inflammatory cytokine production are possible pathogenic mechanisms. Although the detailed pathophysiology of CM remains unsolved, it is thought that the binding of parasitized erythrocytes to the cerebral endothelia of microvessels, leading to their occlusion and the consequent angiogenic dysregulation play a key role in the disease pathogenesis. Recent evidences showed that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptor-related molecules are over-expressed in the brain tissues of CM patients, as well as increased levels of VEGF are detectable in biologic samples from malaria patients. Whether the modulation of VEGF is causative agent of CM mortality or a specific phenotype of patients with susceptibility to fatal CM needs further evaluation. Currently, there is no biological test available to confirm the diagnosis of CM and its complications. It is hoped that development of biomarkers to identify patients and potential risk for adverse outcomes would greatly enhance better intervention and clinical management to improve the outcomes. We review and discuss here what it is currently known in regard to the role of VEGF in CM as well as VEGF as a potential biomarker.
2014
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11391/1196877
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