Objective: The association between papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) is widely recognized, but less is known about the possible link between circulating anti-thyroglobulin antibody (TgAb) titers and PTC aggressiveness. To shed light on this issue, we retrospectively examined a large series of PTC patients, with and without positive TgAb. Methods: Data on 220 TgAb-positive PTC patients (study cohort) were retrospectively collected in 10 hospital-based referral centers. All the patients had undergone near-total thyroidectomy with or without radioiodine remnant ablation. Tumor characteristics and long-term outcomes (follow-up range: 2.5-24.8 years) were compared with those recently reported in 1020 TgAb-negative PTC patients with similar demographic characteristics. We also assessed the impact on clinical outcome of early titer negativization in the TgAb-positive group. Results: At baseline, the study cohort (mean age 45.9 years, range 12.5-84.1 years; 85% women) had significantly higher prevalence of high-risk patients (6.9% vs. 3.2%, p<0.05) and extrathyroidal tumor extension (28.2% vs. 24%; p<0.0001) than TgAb-negative controls. Study cohort patients were also more likely than controls to have persistent disease at the 1-year visit (13.6% vs 7.0%, p=0.001) or recurrence during subsequent follow-up (5.8% vs. 1.4%, p=0.0001). At the final follow-up visit, the percentage of patients with either persistent or recurrent disease in the two cohorts was significantly different (6.4% of TgAb-positive patients vs. 1.7% in the TgAb-negative group, p<0.0001). At the 1-year visit, titer normalization was observed in 85 of the 220 TgAb-positive individuals. These patients had a significantly lower rate of persistent disease than those who were still TgAb-positive (8.2% vs. 17.3%. p=0.05), and no relapses were observed among no evidence of disease cases during subsequent follow-up. Conclusions: PTC patients with positive serum TgAb titer during the first year after primary treatment were more likely to have persistent/recurrent disease than those who were consistently TgAb-negative. Negative titers at 1 year may be associated with more favorable outcomes.

Clinical aggressiveness and long-term outcome in patients with papillary thyroid cancer and circulating anti-thyroglobulin autoantibodies.

PUXEDDU, Efisio;
2014

Abstract

Objective: The association between papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) is widely recognized, but less is known about the possible link between circulating anti-thyroglobulin antibody (TgAb) titers and PTC aggressiveness. To shed light on this issue, we retrospectively examined a large series of PTC patients, with and without positive TgAb. Methods: Data on 220 TgAb-positive PTC patients (study cohort) were retrospectively collected in 10 hospital-based referral centers. All the patients had undergone near-total thyroidectomy with or without radioiodine remnant ablation. Tumor characteristics and long-term outcomes (follow-up range: 2.5-24.8 years) were compared with those recently reported in 1020 TgAb-negative PTC patients with similar demographic characteristics. We also assessed the impact on clinical outcome of early titer negativization in the TgAb-positive group. Results: At baseline, the study cohort (mean age 45.9 years, range 12.5-84.1 years; 85% women) had significantly higher prevalence of high-risk patients (6.9% vs. 3.2%, p<0.05) and extrathyroidal tumor extension (28.2% vs. 24%; p<0.0001) than TgAb-negative controls. Study cohort patients were also more likely than controls to have persistent disease at the 1-year visit (13.6% vs 7.0%, p=0.001) or recurrence during subsequent follow-up (5.8% vs. 1.4%, p=0.0001). At the final follow-up visit, the percentage of patients with either persistent or recurrent disease in the two cohorts was significantly different (6.4% of TgAb-positive patients vs. 1.7% in the TgAb-negative group, p<0.0001). At the 1-year visit, titer normalization was observed in 85 of the 220 TgAb-positive individuals. These patients had a significantly lower rate of persistent disease than those who were still TgAb-positive (8.2% vs. 17.3%. p=0.05), and no relapses were observed among no evidence of disease cases during subsequent follow-up. Conclusions: PTC patients with positive serum TgAb titer during the first year after primary treatment were more likely to have persistent/recurrent disease than those who were consistently TgAb-negative. Negative titers at 1 year may be associated with more favorable outcomes.
2014
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11391/1216284
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