Background and purpose: Increased headache frequency and severity have been observed in obese populations, but the real impact of a weight loss treatment on headache has not been studied. We investigated this issue in a sample of obese adolescents. Methods: In all, 135 migraineurs, aged 14-18 years, with body mass index (BMI) ≥97th percentile, participating in a 12-month-long program, were studied before and after treatment. The program included dietary education, specific physical training, and behavioral treatment. Results: Decreases in weight (P < 0.01), BMI (P < 0.01), waist circumference (P < 0.01), headache frequency (P < 0.01) and intensity (P < 0.01), use of acute medications (P < 0.05), and disability (P < 0.05) were observed at the end of the first 6-month period and were maintained through the second 6 months. Both lower baseline BMI and excess change in BMI were significantly associated with better migraine outcomes 12 months after the intervention program. Conclusions: Significant improvements in both adiposity and headache data were observed in obese adolescents with migraine who participated in a 12-month-long interdisciplinary intervention program for weight loss. Initial body weight and amount of weight loss may be useful for clinicians to predict migraine outcomes

Impact of a weight loss program on migraine in obese adolescents

VERROTTI DI PIANELLA, ALBERTO;
2013

Abstract

Background and purpose: Increased headache frequency and severity have been observed in obese populations, but the real impact of a weight loss treatment on headache has not been studied. We investigated this issue in a sample of obese adolescents. Methods: In all, 135 migraineurs, aged 14-18 years, with body mass index (BMI) ≥97th percentile, participating in a 12-month-long program, were studied before and after treatment. The program included dietary education, specific physical training, and behavioral treatment. Results: Decreases in weight (P < 0.01), BMI (P < 0.01), waist circumference (P < 0.01), headache frequency (P < 0.01) and intensity (P < 0.01), use of acute medications (P < 0.05), and disability (P < 0.05) were observed at the end of the first 6-month period and were maintained through the second 6 months. Both lower baseline BMI and excess change in BMI were significantly associated with better migraine outcomes 12 months after the intervention program. Conclusions: Significant improvements in both adiposity and headache data were observed in obese adolescents with migraine who participated in a 12-month-long interdisciplinary intervention program for weight loss. Initial body weight and amount of weight loss may be useful for clinicians to predict migraine outcomes
2013
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11391/1230146
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