Objective/Background Absence of an adequate iliac seal rarely represents an absolute contraindication to endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Iliac branch devices (IBD) are increasingly used in patients with extensive aorto-iliac aneurysmal disease, but few data are available on the long-term results of these procedures. Methods Between 2006 and 2016, 157 consecutive IBD procedures performed at a single centre were entered into a prospective database. Indications included unilateral or bilateral common iliac artery aneurysms combined or not with abdominal aortic aneurysms. Long-term results were reported according to the Kaplan–Meier method. Results During the study period 149 patients were treated with an iliac branched endograft. Isolated IBD was implanted in 17.8% of the cases; technical success rate was 97.5%. Peri-operative procedure failure occurred in seven patients, four during surgery and three within 30 days of the procedure. Presence of ipsilateral hypogastric aneurysm (p = .031; Exp [B] = 6.72) and intervention performed during the initial study period (p = .006; Exp [B] = 10.40) were predictive of early failure on multivariate analysis. After a mean follow-up of 44.2 months actuarial freedom from IBD related re-intervention was 97.4%, 95.6%, 94.0%, and 91.8% at 1, 3, 5, and 9 years, respectively. Hypogastric artery patency was 94.7%, 92.6%, and 90.4% at 1, 3, and 10 years, respectively. Presence of a hypogastric aneurysm was an independent predictor of target artery occlusion during follow-up on multivariate analysis (p = .007; Exp [B] = 5.93). Conclusion Iliac branched endografting can now be performed with a high technical success rate; long-term freedom from re-intervention is comparable with patients treated with standard aortic endografting. IBD should be considered a first-option treatment in patients with adequate vascular anatomy unsuitable for standard endovascular aortic repair.

Lesson Learned with the Use of Iliac Branch Devices: Single Centre 10 Year Experience in 157 Consecutive Procedures

CIERI, ENRICO
Conceptualization
;
2017

Abstract

Objective/Background Absence of an adequate iliac seal rarely represents an absolute contraindication to endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Iliac branch devices (IBD) are increasingly used in patients with extensive aorto-iliac aneurysmal disease, but few data are available on the long-term results of these procedures. Methods Between 2006 and 2016, 157 consecutive IBD procedures performed at a single centre were entered into a prospective database. Indications included unilateral or bilateral common iliac artery aneurysms combined or not with abdominal aortic aneurysms. Long-term results were reported according to the Kaplan–Meier method. Results During the study period 149 patients were treated with an iliac branched endograft. Isolated IBD was implanted in 17.8% of the cases; technical success rate was 97.5%. Peri-operative procedure failure occurred in seven patients, four during surgery and three within 30 days of the procedure. Presence of ipsilateral hypogastric aneurysm (p = .031; Exp [B] = 6.72) and intervention performed during the initial study period (p = .006; Exp [B] = 10.40) were predictive of early failure on multivariate analysis. After a mean follow-up of 44.2 months actuarial freedom from IBD related re-intervention was 97.4%, 95.6%, 94.0%, and 91.8% at 1, 3, 5, and 9 years, respectively. Hypogastric artery patency was 94.7%, 92.6%, and 90.4% at 1, 3, and 10 years, respectively. Presence of a hypogastric aneurysm was an independent predictor of target artery occlusion during follow-up on multivariate analysis (p = .007; Exp [B] = 5.93). Conclusion Iliac branched endografting can now be performed with a high technical success rate; long-term freedom from re-intervention is comparable with patients treated with standard aortic endografting. IBD should be considered a first-option treatment in patients with adequate vascular anatomy unsuitable for standard endovascular aortic repair.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11391/1407671
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