It is commonly thought that when multiple carbon sources are available, bacteria metabolize them either sequentially (diauxic growth) or simultaneously (co-utilization). However, this view is mainly based on analyses in relatively simple laboratory settings. Here we show that a heterotrophic marine bacterium, Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis, can use both strategies simultaneously when multiple possible nutrients are provided in the same growth experiment. The order of nutrient uptake is partially determined by the biomass yield that can be achieved when the same compounds are provided as single carbon sources. Using transcriptomics and time-resolved intracellular 1H-13C NMR, we reveal specific pathways for utilization of various amino acids. Finally, theoretical modelling indicates that this metabolic phenotype, combining diauxie and co-utilization of substrates, is compatible with a tight regulation that allows the modulation of assimilatory pathways.

Diauxie and co-utilization of carbon sources can coexist during bacterial growth in nutritionally complex environments

Di Patti F.;
2020

Abstract

It is commonly thought that when multiple carbon sources are available, bacteria metabolize them either sequentially (diauxic growth) or simultaneously (co-utilization). However, this view is mainly based on analyses in relatively simple laboratory settings. Here we show that a heterotrophic marine bacterium, Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis, can use both strategies simultaneously when multiple possible nutrients are provided in the same growth experiment. The order of nutrient uptake is partially determined by the biomass yield that can be achieved when the same compounds are provided as single carbon sources. Using transcriptomics and time-resolved intracellular 1H-13C NMR, we reveal specific pathways for utilization of various amino acids. Finally, theoretical modelling indicates that this metabolic phenotype, combining diauxie and co-utilization of substrates, is compatible with a tight regulation that allows the modulation of assimilatory pathways.
2020
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11391/1500193
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