Ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI), a measure based on the relative behavior of 24-hour systolic and diastolic blood pressure ( BP), has been suggested as a marker of arterial stiffness and a predictor of cardiovascular mortality. However, a narrow range of diastolic BP values over the 24 hours tends to flatten the regression slope and to artificially increase AASI. We explored the possible influence of different ranges of 24-hour diastolic BP fluctuations, such as those related to nocturnal BP fall, on AASI, and on its relationship with target organ damage. In 515 untreated hypertensive patients, AASI was directly related to age ( r = 0.30) and 24-hour systolic BP ( r = 0.20), whereas it was inversely related with nocturnal systolic and diastolic BP reduction ( r = - 0.28 and - 0.46, respectively; all P < 0.001). A direct relationship was found between AASI and left ventricular mass index ( r = 0.17; P < 0.001), but this relation was no longer significant after adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, daytime systolic BP, and day - night systolic BP reduction ( all P < 0.05). AASI was directly related to carotid - femoral pulse wave velocity, an intrinsic measure of aortic stiffness ( r = 0.28; P < 0.001), but no independent relation was found in a multiple linear regression. Our conclusions are as follows: ( 1) AASI is strongly dependent on the degree of nocturnal BP fall in hypertensive patients; ( 2) there is no significant relation between AASI and left ventricular mass after proper adjustment for confounders; and ( 3) the relation between AASI and a widely accepted measure of aortic stiffness, such as pulse wave velocity, is weak and importantly affected by other factors.

Ambulatory arterial stiffness index is not a specific marker of reduced arterial compliance.

SCHILLACI, Giuseppe;PIRRO, Matteo;PUCCI, GIACOMO;MANNARINO, MASSIMO RAFFAELE;MANNARINO, Elmo
2007-01-01

Abstract

Ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI), a measure based on the relative behavior of 24-hour systolic and diastolic blood pressure ( BP), has been suggested as a marker of arterial stiffness and a predictor of cardiovascular mortality. However, a narrow range of diastolic BP values over the 24 hours tends to flatten the regression slope and to artificially increase AASI. We explored the possible influence of different ranges of 24-hour diastolic BP fluctuations, such as those related to nocturnal BP fall, on AASI, and on its relationship with target organ damage. In 515 untreated hypertensive patients, AASI was directly related to age ( r = 0.30) and 24-hour systolic BP ( r = 0.20), whereas it was inversely related with nocturnal systolic and diastolic BP reduction ( r = - 0.28 and - 0.46, respectively; all P < 0.001). A direct relationship was found between AASI and left ventricular mass index ( r = 0.17; P < 0.001), but this relation was no longer significant after adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, daytime systolic BP, and day - night systolic BP reduction ( all P < 0.05). AASI was directly related to carotid - femoral pulse wave velocity, an intrinsic measure of aortic stiffness ( r = 0.28; P < 0.001), but no independent relation was found in a multiple linear regression. Our conclusions are as follows: ( 1) AASI is strongly dependent on the degree of nocturnal BP fall in hypertensive patients; ( 2) there is no significant relation between AASI and left ventricular mass after proper adjustment for confounders; and ( 3) the relation between AASI and a widely accepted measure of aortic stiffness, such as pulse wave velocity, is weak and importantly affected by other factors.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11391/152497
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