Snap-fit joints represent a simple, economical and straightforward way of joining two different components. The design of the snap-fit joint is usually performed evaluating peak stresses that must be tolerated by the material without incurring into failure or plastic deformations; in addition, the force needed to join and disassemble parts is estimated in relation to ergonomic issues. Finally, the retention force, that is the force required to start disjoining parts, needs to be estimated. The evaluation of peak stresses or insertion/retention/removal forces is commonly performed through finite element method, having identified the respective deformed configuration. A different approach has been here followed considering that it is not trivial to identify the most critical condition in a full joining/disjoining cycle, when complex geometries are being considered. In detail, the snap joint has been modelled as a multibody model including a flexible body, which replicates the part that undergoes major deflections during the process. The model has been validated against experimental force – time curves, recorded for an existing joint, and it has been used to optimize a parametrised snap-fit design. As a result, the joining force has been reduced up to −84%; the disassembly force has been reduced up to −86% and the retention force has been incremented up to +7%. On the whole, a numerical framework to study these joints has been established, keeping the computational time reasonably low (about 40 min for the entire insertion and removal simulation).

Design of a snap-fit joint through a multibody model

Giulia Pascoletti
;
Paolo Conti;Francesco Bianconi;Elisabetta Maria Zanetti
2022

Abstract

Snap-fit joints represent a simple, economical and straightforward way of joining two different components. The design of the snap-fit joint is usually performed evaluating peak stresses that must be tolerated by the material without incurring into failure or plastic deformations; in addition, the force needed to join and disassemble parts is estimated in relation to ergonomic issues. Finally, the retention force, that is the force required to start disjoining parts, needs to be estimated. The evaluation of peak stresses or insertion/retention/removal forces is commonly performed through finite element method, having identified the respective deformed configuration. A different approach has been here followed considering that it is not trivial to identify the most critical condition in a full joining/disjoining cycle, when complex geometries are being considered. In detail, the snap joint has been modelled as a multibody model including a flexible body, which replicates the part that undergoes major deflections during the process. The model has been validated against experimental force – time curves, recorded for an existing joint, and it has been used to optimize a parametrised snap-fit design. As a result, the joining force has been reduced up to −84%; the disassembly force has been reduced up to −86% and the retention force has been incremented up to +7%. On the whole, a numerical framework to study these joints has been established, keeping the computational time reasonably low (about 40 min for the entire insertion and removal simulation).
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11391/1532775
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