Simple Summary Obesity and overconditioning are becoming more prevalent in horses and could be the cause behind various diseases. Evaluation of body condition scores (BCS) and cresty neck scores (CNS) are important tools used to assess the risk of obesity, and owners and caretakers should be able to correctly evaluate their animals. The aim of this study was to compare the ability of owners to correctly assess the BCS and CNS of their animals, comparing them with the scores given by an experienced examiner. In our population, overconditioning was present in 29% and 24% of horses according to the owners and the vet, respectively, while obesity was detected by the owners and the vet in 2% and 1% of cases, respectively. Agreement between the owners and the vet was slight for both body condition score and cresty neck score, and it was influenced by age, breed, gender, and activity of the horse. Education of owners and caretakers to correctly assess their animals is important to prevent the development of obesity and overconditioning and related diseases. Obesity and overconditioning are becoming more prevalent in horses, and are influencing the animal's health, activity, and reproductive efficiency. Body condition score (BCS) and cresty neck score (CNS) have been correlated with the development of various diseases. Many of the papers in the literature evaluate the prevalence of obesity and overconditioning in horse populations considering BCS given by owners. The aim of this study was to evaluate the validity of the owners' estimation of the degree of equine obesity or overconditioning by comparing BCS and CNS provided by each owner and a board-certified vet to a cohort of 259 horses and their agreement based on age, breed, sex, and activity of the animals. Overconditioning was present in 29% and 24% of horses according to the owners and the vet, respectively, and obesity in 2% and 1%, respectively. Agreement between BCS and CNS given by the owners and the vet was slight, with owners scoring horses either lower or higher than the vet. Agreement between the owners and the vet assessment was also influenced by age, breed, sex, and activity of the animals. Education of owners and caretakers to correctly assess BCS and CNS and regular evaluation of the animals throughout the year is important to prevent the development of obesity and overconditioning and related diseases.

Are Horse Owners Able to Estimate Their Animals' Body Condition Score and Cresty Neck Score?

Busechian, Sara;Sgorbini, Micaela;Pieramati, Camillo;Pisello, Lorenzo;Orvieto, Simona;Rueca, Fabrizio
2022

Abstract

Simple Summary Obesity and overconditioning are becoming more prevalent in horses and could be the cause behind various diseases. Evaluation of body condition scores (BCS) and cresty neck scores (CNS) are important tools used to assess the risk of obesity, and owners and caretakers should be able to correctly evaluate their animals. The aim of this study was to compare the ability of owners to correctly assess the BCS and CNS of their animals, comparing them with the scores given by an experienced examiner. In our population, overconditioning was present in 29% and 24% of horses according to the owners and the vet, respectively, while obesity was detected by the owners and the vet in 2% and 1% of cases, respectively. Agreement between the owners and the vet was slight for both body condition score and cresty neck score, and it was influenced by age, breed, gender, and activity of the horse. Education of owners and caretakers to correctly assess their animals is important to prevent the development of obesity and overconditioning and related diseases. Obesity and overconditioning are becoming more prevalent in horses, and are influencing the animal's health, activity, and reproductive efficiency. Body condition score (BCS) and cresty neck score (CNS) have been correlated with the development of various diseases. Many of the papers in the literature evaluate the prevalence of obesity and overconditioning in horse populations considering BCS given by owners. The aim of this study was to evaluate the validity of the owners' estimation of the degree of equine obesity or overconditioning by comparing BCS and CNS provided by each owner and a board-certified vet to a cohort of 259 horses and their agreement based on age, breed, sex, and activity of the animals. Overconditioning was present in 29% and 24% of horses according to the owners and the vet, respectively, and obesity in 2% and 1%, respectively. Agreement between BCS and CNS given by the owners and the vet was slight, with owners scoring horses either lower or higher than the vet. Agreement between the owners and the vet assessment was also influenced by age, breed, sex, and activity of the animals. Education of owners and caretakers to correctly assess BCS and CNS and regular evaluation of the animals throughout the year is important to prevent the development of obesity and overconditioning and related diseases.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11391/1534555
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