Infectious bursal disease (IBD), caused by an Avibirnavirus, belonging to the family Birnaviridae, is an immunosuppressive disease that affects 3–6-week-old chickens, resulting in clinical or subclinical infection. Although clinical disease occurs in chickens, turkeys, ducks, guinea fowl, and ostriches can be also infected. IBD virus (IBDV) causes lymphoid depletion of the bursa, which is responsible for the severe depression of the humoral antibody response, primarily if this occurs within the first 2 weeks of life. IBD remains an issue in chicken meat production due to economic losses caused by the spread of variants or subtypes, resistant to the most common vaccines, responsible for a subclinical disease characterized by reduced growth performance and increased susceptibility to secondary infections. Very virulent strains of classical serotype 1 are also common in several countries and can cause severe disease with up to 90% mortality. This review mainly focuses on the immunosuppressive effect of the IBDV and potential vaccination strategies, capable of overcoming challenges associated with the optimal time for vaccination of offspring, which is dependent on maternal immunity and IBDV variant occurrence

A walk through Gumboro Disease

Maria Pia Franciosini
;
2022-01-01

Abstract

Infectious bursal disease (IBD), caused by an Avibirnavirus, belonging to the family Birnaviridae, is an immunosuppressive disease that affects 3–6-week-old chickens, resulting in clinical or subclinical infection. Although clinical disease occurs in chickens, turkeys, ducks, guinea fowl, and ostriches can be also infected. IBD virus (IBDV) causes lymphoid depletion of the bursa, which is responsible for the severe depression of the humoral antibody response, primarily if this occurs within the first 2 weeks of life. IBD remains an issue in chicken meat production due to economic losses caused by the spread of variants or subtypes, resistant to the most common vaccines, responsible for a subclinical disease characterized by reduced growth performance and increased susceptibility to secondary infections. Very virulent strains of classical serotype 1 are also common in several countries and can cause severe disease with up to 90% mortality. This review mainly focuses on the immunosuppressive effect of the IBDV and potential vaccination strategies, capable of overcoming challenges associated with the optimal time for vaccination of offspring, which is dependent on maternal immunity and IBDV variant occurrence
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11391/1536314
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