The biofabrication of three-dimensional scaffolds using 3D printers and cell-containing bioinks is very promising. A wide range of materials and bioink compositions are being created and tested for cell viability and printability in order to satisfy the requirements of a bioink. This methodology has not still achieved technological maturity, and the actual costs mean that they are often inaccessible for researchers, consequently lowering the development and extending the required times. This research aims to apply this methodology on a laboratory scale by re-adapting a commercial 3D printer, consequently lowering the costs and energy impacts, and, at the same time, ensuring a level of accuracy extremely close to the currently adopted devices and, more in general, suitable for the scopes of the research. To accomplish this, we assembled a biomimetic scaffold made of human Umbilical Cord Matrix Stem Cells (hUCMS), cellulose, and alginate. Various molds were used to produce 3D scaffolds of different sizes. After bioprinting, cell viability was analyzed using ethidium bromide and fluorescein diacetate, and a histological stain was used to evaluate cell and bioink morphology. All of the examined bioinks had a uniform final 3D structure and were stable, easily printable, and procedure-adapted. Up until 21 days of culture, the bioinks remained unaltered and were simple to manipulate. After 7 and 21 days of cell culture, the hUCMS in the cellulose/alginate-based bioinks exhibited cell viabilities of 95% and 85%, respectively. The cells did not present with a fibroblast-like shape but appeared to be round-shaped and homogeneously distributed in the 3D structure. Biomimetic bioink, which is based on cellulose and alginate, is an appropriate hydrogel for 3D bioprinting. This preliminary work illustrated the potential use of these two biomaterials for the 3D bioprinting of mesenchymal stem cells.

Utilization of a Commercial 3D Printer for the Construction of a Bio-Hybrid Device Based on Bioink and Adult Human Mesenchymal Cells

Giulio Morelli;Teresa pescara;Alessia Greco;Pia Montanucci;Giuseppe Basta;Federico Rossi;Riccardo Calafiore;Alberto Maria Gambelli
2023-01-01

Abstract

The biofabrication of three-dimensional scaffolds using 3D printers and cell-containing bioinks is very promising. A wide range of materials and bioink compositions are being created and tested for cell viability and printability in order to satisfy the requirements of a bioink. This methodology has not still achieved technological maturity, and the actual costs mean that they are often inaccessible for researchers, consequently lowering the development and extending the required times. This research aims to apply this methodology on a laboratory scale by re-adapting a commercial 3D printer, consequently lowering the costs and energy impacts, and, at the same time, ensuring a level of accuracy extremely close to the currently adopted devices and, more in general, suitable for the scopes of the research. To accomplish this, we assembled a biomimetic scaffold made of human Umbilical Cord Matrix Stem Cells (hUCMS), cellulose, and alginate. Various molds were used to produce 3D scaffolds of different sizes. After bioprinting, cell viability was analyzed using ethidium bromide and fluorescein diacetate, and a histological stain was used to evaluate cell and bioink morphology. All of the examined bioinks had a uniform final 3D structure and were stable, easily printable, and procedure-adapted. Up until 21 days of culture, the bioinks remained unaltered and were simple to manipulate. After 7 and 21 days of cell culture, the hUCMS in the cellulose/alginate-based bioinks exhibited cell viabilities of 95% and 85%, respectively. The cells did not present with a fibroblast-like shape but appeared to be round-shaped and homogeneously distributed in the 3D structure. Biomimetic bioink, which is based on cellulose and alginate, is an appropriate hydrogel for 3D bioprinting. This preliminary work illustrated the potential use of these two biomaterials for the 3D bioprinting of mesenchymal stem cells.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11391/1538396
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