Objective: The use of transvaginal mesh is controversial, and over time, multiple surgical methods for the treatment of posterior vaginal prolapse (PVP) have been proposed including different surgical approaches and techniques. To date, no clear conclusion has been reached about the use of mesh for reinforcing transvaginal posterior repair. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, safety, and effectiveness of a novel, ultralightweight mesh for the treatment of PVP. Methods: We performed a single-center, prospective observational study on consecutive patients referred for primary or recurrent, symptomatic stage II PVP (according to the international Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification System) from April 2017 to September 2018. In all patients, transvaginal posterior repair was augmented with a single-incision, isoelastic polypropylene mesh. Data about the postoperative outcomes were collected until December 2019. Results: A total number of 15 patients were included. The median follow-up after surgery was 18 months (IQR = 14). Surgery was completed in all cases without complications. Regarding the anatomical outcomes (as measured according to POP-q classification), a significant improvement was observed in terms of Bp, D, and C (p < 0.05). The functional outcomes were significantly ameliorated after surgery, with a reduction of bulge symptom, stypsis, incomplete evacuation, and excessive staining (p < 0.05). The quality of life was significantly improved in the majority of patients (p < 0.05). Median patients' satisfaction rate was 100% (IQR = 22.5%). Neither early nor late postoperative complications occurred. Conclusions: Single-incision, ultralightweight polypropylene meshes were safe and highly effective in the treatment of PVP. As our study has some limitations, further large, controlled studies are needed.

Effectiveness and Safety of Posterior Vaginal Repair with Single-Incision, Ultralightweight, Monofilament Propylene Mesh: First Evidence from a Case Series with Short-Term Results

Favilli A;
2021-01-01

Abstract

Objective: The use of transvaginal mesh is controversial, and over time, multiple surgical methods for the treatment of posterior vaginal prolapse (PVP) have been proposed including different surgical approaches and techniques. To date, no clear conclusion has been reached about the use of mesh for reinforcing transvaginal posterior repair. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility, safety, and effectiveness of a novel, ultralightweight mesh for the treatment of PVP. Methods: We performed a single-center, prospective observational study on consecutive patients referred for primary or recurrent, symptomatic stage II PVP (according to the international Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification System) from April 2017 to September 2018. In all patients, transvaginal posterior repair was augmented with a single-incision, isoelastic polypropylene mesh. Data about the postoperative outcomes were collected until December 2019. Results: A total number of 15 patients were included. The median follow-up after surgery was 18 months (IQR = 14). Surgery was completed in all cases without complications. Regarding the anatomical outcomes (as measured according to POP-q classification), a significant improvement was observed in terms of Bp, D, and C (p < 0.05). The functional outcomes were significantly ameliorated after surgery, with a reduction of bulge symptom, stypsis, incomplete evacuation, and excessive staining (p < 0.05). The quality of life was significantly improved in the majority of patients (p < 0.05). Median patients' satisfaction rate was 100% (IQR = 22.5%). Neither early nor late postoperative complications occurred. Conclusions: Single-incision, ultralightweight polypropylene meshes were safe and highly effective in the treatment of PVP. As our study has some limitations, further large, controlled studies are needed.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11391/1538735
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