: Puerperium is a period of great vulnerability for the woman, associated with intense physical and emotional changes. Maternity blues (MB), also known as baby blues, postnatal blues, or post-partum blues, include low mood and mild, transient, self-limited depressive symptoms, which can be developed in the first days after delivery. However, the correct identification of this condition is difficult because a shared definition and well-established diagnostic tools are not still available. A great heterogenicity has been reported worldwide regarding MB prevalence. Studies described an overall prevalence of 39%, ranging from 13.7% to 76%, according to the cultural and geographical contexts. MB is a well-established risk factor for shifting to more severe post-partum mood disorders, such as post-partum depression and postpartum psychosis. Several risk factors and pathophysiological mechanisms which could provide the foundation of MB have been the object of investigations, but only poor evidence and speculations are available until now. Taking into account its non-negligible prevalence after childbirth, making an early diagnosis of MB is important to provide adequate and prompt support to the mother, which may contribute to avoiding evolutions toward more serious post-partum disorders. In this paper, we aimed to offer an overview of the knowledge available of MB in terms of definitions, diagnosis tools, pathophysiological mechanisms, and all major clinical aspects. Clinicians should know MB and be aware of its potential evolutions in order to offer the most timely and effective evidence-based care.

Maternity Blues: A Narrative Review

Tosto, Valentina;Ceccobelli, Margherita;Lucarini, Emanuela;Tortorella, Alfonso;Gerli, Sandro;Favilli, Alessandro
2023

Abstract

: Puerperium is a period of great vulnerability for the woman, associated with intense physical and emotional changes. Maternity blues (MB), also known as baby blues, postnatal blues, or post-partum blues, include low mood and mild, transient, self-limited depressive symptoms, which can be developed in the first days after delivery. However, the correct identification of this condition is difficult because a shared definition and well-established diagnostic tools are not still available. A great heterogenicity has been reported worldwide regarding MB prevalence. Studies described an overall prevalence of 39%, ranging from 13.7% to 76%, according to the cultural and geographical contexts. MB is a well-established risk factor for shifting to more severe post-partum mood disorders, such as post-partum depression and postpartum psychosis. Several risk factors and pathophysiological mechanisms which could provide the foundation of MB have been the object of investigations, but only poor evidence and speculations are available until now. Taking into account its non-negligible prevalence after childbirth, making an early diagnosis of MB is important to provide adequate and prompt support to the mother, which may contribute to avoiding evolutions toward more serious post-partum disorders. In this paper, we aimed to offer an overview of the knowledge available of MB in terms of definitions, diagnosis tools, pathophysiological mechanisms, and all major clinical aspects. Clinicians should know MB and be aware of its potential evolutions in order to offer the most timely and effective evidence-based care.
2023
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11391/1540049
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 2
  • Scopus 4
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 4
social impact