IntroductionDissociative symptoms have been recently related to bipolar disorder (BD) symptomatology. Moreover, the disease burden carries on a share of perceived self-stigma that amplifies the BD impairment. Internalized stigma and dissociative symptoms often seem overlapping, leading toward common outcomes, with reduced treatment seeking and poor adherence. We hypothesize a potential relationship between dissociation and self-stigma in patients suffering from BD. Materials and methodsIn this cross-sectional study we enrolled a total of 120 adult clinically stable BD outpatients. All participants completed the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness (ISMI), Dissociative Experiences Scale-II (DES-II), and Manchester Short Assessment of Quality of Life (MANSA). ResultsAverage age and age at BD (BD-I n = 66, 55%; BD-II n = 54, 45%) onset were 46.14 (+/- 4.23), and 27.45 (+/- 10.35) years, with mean disease duration of 18.56 (+/- 13.08) years. Most participants were female (n = 71; 59.2%) and 40 (33%) of them experienced lifetime abuse, with an average of 1.05 (+/- 0.78) suicide attempts. DES scores (mean 31.8, +/- 21.6) correlated with ISMI total-score, with significant association with spikes in Alienation (13.1, SD +/- 3.1) (p < 0.001) and Stereotype (13.8, SD +/- 3.9) (p < 0.001). Linear regression analysis has shown a significant association between DES total score and alienation (p < 0.001), stereotype (p < 0.001) and MANSA total-score (p < 0.001). DiscussionFor the first time, our data suggests that self-stigma is associated to dissociative symptoms, reducing overall quality of life in BD. The early identification of at-risk patients with previous lifetime abuse and high perceived stigma could lead the way for an ever more precise tailoring of treatment management.

Internalized-stigma and dissociative experiences in bipolar disorder

Menculini, Giulia;Tortorella, Alfonso;
2022

Abstract

IntroductionDissociative symptoms have been recently related to bipolar disorder (BD) symptomatology. Moreover, the disease burden carries on a share of perceived self-stigma that amplifies the BD impairment. Internalized stigma and dissociative symptoms often seem overlapping, leading toward common outcomes, with reduced treatment seeking and poor adherence. We hypothesize a potential relationship between dissociation and self-stigma in patients suffering from BD. Materials and methodsIn this cross-sectional study we enrolled a total of 120 adult clinically stable BD outpatients. All participants completed the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness (ISMI), Dissociative Experiences Scale-II (DES-II), and Manchester Short Assessment of Quality of Life (MANSA). ResultsAverage age and age at BD (BD-I n = 66, 55%; BD-II n = 54, 45%) onset were 46.14 (+/- 4.23), and 27.45 (+/- 10.35) years, with mean disease duration of 18.56 (+/- 13.08) years. Most participants were female (n = 71; 59.2%) and 40 (33%) of them experienced lifetime abuse, with an average of 1.05 (+/- 0.78) suicide attempts. DES scores (mean 31.8, +/- 21.6) correlated with ISMI total-score, with significant association with spikes in Alienation (13.1, SD +/- 3.1) (p < 0.001) and Stereotype (13.8, SD +/- 3.9) (p < 0.001). Linear regression analysis has shown a significant association between DES total score and alienation (p < 0.001), stereotype (p < 0.001) and MANSA total-score (p < 0.001). DiscussionFor the first time, our data suggests that self-stigma is associated to dissociative symptoms, reducing overall quality of life in BD. The early identification of at-risk patients with previous lifetime abuse and high perceived stigma could lead the way for an ever more precise tailoring of treatment management.
2022
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11391/1540915
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 1
  • Scopus 7
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 7
social impact