BACKGROUND: Self-motion misperception has been observed in vestibular patients during asymmetric body oscillations. This misperception is correlated with the patient's vestibular discomfort. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether or not self-motion misperception persists in post-ictal patients with Ménière's disease (MD). METHODS: Twenty-eight MD patients were investigated while in the post-ictal interval. Self-motion perception was studied by examining the displacement of a memorized visual target after sequences of opposite directed fast-slow asymmetric whole body rotations in the dark. The difference in target representation was analyzed and correlated with the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) score. The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) and clinical tests for ocular reflex were also evaluated. RESULTS: All MD patients showed a noticeable difference in target representation after asymmetric rotation depending on the direction of the fast/slow rotations. This side difference suggests disruption of motion perception. The DHI score was correlated with the amount of motion misperception. In contrast, VOR and clinical trials were altered in only half of these patients. CONCLUSIONS: Asymmetric rotation reveals disruption of self-motion perception in MD patients during the post-ictal interval, even in the absence of ocular reflex impairment. Motion misperception may cause persistent vestibular discomfort in these patients.

Disruption of self-motion perception without vestibular reflex alteration in ménière's disease

Ricci G.;Panichi R.;Pettorossi V. E.
2022

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Self-motion misperception has been observed in vestibular patients during asymmetric body oscillations. This misperception is correlated with the patient's vestibular discomfort. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether or not self-motion misperception persists in post-ictal patients with Ménière's disease (MD). METHODS: Twenty-eight MD patients were investigated while in the post-ictal interval. Self-motion perception was studied by examining the displacement of a memorized visual target after sequences of opposite directed fast-slow asymmetric whole body rotations in the dark. The difference in target representation was analyzed and correlated with the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) score. The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) and clinical tests for ocular reflex were also evaluated. RESULTS: All MD patients showed a noticeable difference in target representation after asymmetric rotation depending on the direction of the fast/slow rotations. This side difference suggests disruption of motion perception. The DHI score was correlated with the amount of motion misperception. In contrast, VOR and clinical trials were altered in only half of these patients. CONCLUSIONS: Asymmetric rotation reveals disruption of self-motion perception in MD patients during the post-ictal interval, even in the absence of ocular reflex impairment. Motion misperception may cause persistent vestibular discomfort in these patients.
2022
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11391/1546316
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