: The present systematic review was aimed at critically summarizing the evidence about treatment-emergent manic/hypomanic and depressive switches during the course of bipolar disorder (BD). A systematic search of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science, and PsycInfo electronic databases was conducted until March 24th, 2021, according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. Observational studies clearly reporting data regarding the prevalence of treatment-emergent mood switches in patients with BD were considered for inclusion. Thirty-two original studies met the inclusion criteria. In the majority of cases, manic switches were analyzed; only 3 papers investigated depressive switches in type I BD. Treatment-emergent mania/hypomania in BD subjects ranged from 17.3% to 48.8% and was more frequent with antidepressant monotherapy compared to combination treatment with mood stabilizers, especially lithium, or second-generation antipsychotics. A higher likelihood of mood switch has been reported with tricyclics and a lower rate with bupropion. Depressive switches were detected in 5-16% of type I BD subjects and were associated with first-generation antipsychotic use, the concomitant use of first- and second-generation antipsychotics, and benzodiazepines. The included studies presented considerable methodological heterogeneity, small sample sizes and comparability flaws. In conclusion, many studies, although heterogeneous and partly discordant, have been conducted on manic/hypomanic switches, whereas depressive switches during treatment with antipsychotics are poorly investigated. In BD subjects, both antidepressant and antipsychotic medications seems to play a role in the occurrence of mood switches, although the effects of different pharmacological compounds have yet to be fully investigated.

A systematic review of manic/hypomanic and depressive switches in patients with bipolar disorder in naturalistic settings: The role of antidepressant and antipsychotic drugs

Menculini, Giulia;Tortorella, Alfonso;
2023

Abstract

: The present systematic review was aimed at critically summarizing the evidence about treatment-emergent manic/hypomanic and depressive switches during the course of bipolar disorder (BD). A systematic search of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science, and PsycInfo electronic databases was conducted until March 24th, 2021, according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. Observational studies clearly reporting data regarding the prevalence of treatment-emergent mood switches in patients with BD were considered for inclusion. Thirty-two original studies met the inclusion criteria. In the majority of cases, manic switches were analyzed; only 3 papers investigated depressive switches in type I BD. Treatment-emergent mania/hypomania in BD subjects ranged from 17.3% to 48.8% and was more frequent with antidepressant monotherapy compared to combination treatment with mood stabilizers, especially lithium, or second-generation antipsychotics. A higher likelihood of mood switch has been reported with tricyclics and a lower rate with bupropion. Depressive switches were detected in 5-16% of type I BD subjects and were associated with first-generation antipsychotic use, the concomitant use of first- and second-generation antipsychotics, and benzodiazepines. The included studies presented considerable methodological heterogeneity, small sample sizes and comparability flaws. In conclusion, many studies, although heterogeneous and partly discordant, have been conducted on manic/hypomanic switches, whereas depressive switches during treatment with antipsychotics are poorly investigated. In BD subjects, both antidepressant and antipsychotic medications seems to play a role in the occurrence of mood switches, although the effects of different pharmacological compounds have yet to be fully investigated.
2023
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11391/1548498
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