Introduction: The effectiveness of canakinumab may change according to the different times it is used after Still's disease onset. This study aimed to investigate whether canakinumab (CAN) shows differences in short- and long-term therapeutic outcomes, according to its use as different lines of biologic treatment.Methods: Patients included in this study were retrospectively enrolled from the AutoInflammatory Disease Alliance (AIDA) International Registry dedicated to Still's disease. Seventy-seven (51 females and 26 males) patients with Still's disease were included in the present study. In total, 39 (50.6%) patients underwent CAN as a first-line biologic agent, and the remaining 38 (49.4%) patients were treated with CAN as a second-line biologic agent or subsequent biologic agent.Results: No statistically significant differences were found between patients treated with CAN as a first-line biologic agent and those previously treated with other biologic agents in terms of the frequency of complete response (p =0.62), partial response (p =0.61), treatment failure (p >0.99), and frequency of patients discontinuing CAN due to lack or loss of efficacy (p =0.2). Of all the patients, 18 (23.4%) patients experienced disease relapse during canakinumab treatment, 9 patients were treated with canakinumab as a first-line biologic agent, and nine patients were treated with a second-line or subsequent biologic agent. No differences were found in the frequency of glucocorticoid use (p =0.34), daily glucocorticoid dosage (p =0.47), or concomitant methotrexate dosage (p =0.43) at the last assessment during CAN treatment.Conclusion: Canakinumab has proved to be effective in patients with Still's disease, regardless of its line of biologic treatment.

Efficacy of canakinumab in patients with Still's disease across different lines of biologic therapy: real-life data from the International AIDA Network Registry for Still's Disease

Bartoloni, Elena;
2023

Abstract

Introduction: The effectiveness of canakinumab may change according to the different times it is used after Still's disease onset. This study aimed to investigate whether canakinumab (CAN) shows differences in short- and long-term therapeutic outcomes, according to its use as different lines of biologic treatment.Methods: Patients included in this study were retrospectively enrolled from the AutoInflammatory Disease Alliance (AIDA) International Registry dedicated to Still's disease. Seventy-seven (51 females and 26 males) patients with Still's disease were included in the present study. In total, 39 (50.6%) patients underwent CAN as a first-line biologic agent, and the remaining 38 (49.4%) patients were treated with CAN as a second-line biologic agent or subsequent biologic agent.Results: No statistically significant differences were found between patients treated with CAN as a first-line biologic agent and those previously treated with other biologic agents in terms of the frequency of complete response (p =0.62), partial response (p =0.61), treatment failure (p >0.99), and frequency of patients discontinuing CAN due to lack or loss of efficacy (p =0.2). Of all the patients, 18 (23.4%) patients experienced disease relapse during canakinumab treatment, 9 patients were treated with canakinumab as a first-line biologic agent, and nine patients were treated with a second-line or subsequent biologic agent. No differences were found in the frequency of glucocorticoid use (p =0.34), daily glucocorticoid dosage (p =0.47), or concomitant methotrexate dosage (p =0.43) at the last assessment during CAN treatment.Conclusion: Canakinumab has proved to be effective in patients with Still's disease, regardless of its line of biologic treatment.
2023
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11391/1566111
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