Adequate follow-up in celiac disease is important to improve dietary compliance and treat disease-related symptoms and possible complications. However, data on the follow-up of celiac children is scarce. We aimed to assess current pediatric celiac follow-up practices across Europe. Pediatricians and pediatric gastroenterologists from 35 countries in Europe, Israel, Turkey, and Russia completed an anonymous survey which comprised a 52-item questionnaire developed by the ESPGHAN Special Interest Group on Celiac Disease. A total of 911 physicians, the majority of whom exclusively worked in pediatric care (83%) and academic institutions (60%), completed the questionnaire. Mean age and mean experience with celiac care were 48.7 years (+/- 10.6) and 15.7 years (+/- 9.9), respectively. The vast majority (>= 92%) always assessed anthropometry, dietary adherence, and tissue-transglutaminase IgA-antibodies at every visit, with the first visit being between 3 and 6 months after diagnosis. Other parameters (% always tested) were as follows: complete blood count (60%), iron status (48%), liver enzymes (42%), thyroid function (38%), and vitamin D (26%). Quality of life was never assessed by 35% of the responding physicians. Transition to adult care was mostly completed via a written transition report (37%) or no formal transition at all (27%).Conclusions: Follow-up of celiac children and adolescents in Europe may be improved, especially regarding a more rational use of (laboratory) tests, dietary and QoL assessment, and transition to adult care. Evidence-based advice from international scientific societies is needed.

Follow-up practices for children and adolescents with celiac disease: results of an international survey

Valitutti, Francesco;
2022

Abstract

Adequate follow-up in celiac disease is important to improve dietary compliance and treat disease-related symptoms and possible complications. However, data on the follow-up of celiac children is scarce. We aimed to assess current pediatric celiac follow-up practices across Europe. Pediatricians and pediatric gastroenterologists from 35 countries in Europe, Israel, Turkey, and Russia completed an anonymous survey which comprised a 52-item questionnaire developed by the ESPGHAN Special Interest Group on Celiac Disease. A total of 911 physicians, the majority of whom exclusively worked in pediatric care (83%) and academic institutions (60%), completed the questionnaire. Mean age and mean experience with celiac care were 48.7 years (+/- 10.6) and 15.7 years (+/- 9.9), respectively. The vast majority (>= 92%) always assessed anthropometry, dietary adherence, and tissue-transglutaminase IgA-antibodies at every visit, with the first visit being between 3 and 6 months after diagnosis. Other parameters (% always tested) were as follows: complete blood count (60%), iron status (48%), liver enzymes (42%), thyroid function (38%), and vitamin D (26%). Quality of life was never assessed by 35% of the responding physicians. Transition to adult care was mostly completed via a written transition report (37%) or no formal transition at all (27%).Conclusions: Follow-up of celiac children and adolescents in Europe may be improved, especially regarding a more rational use of (laboratory) tests, dietary and QoL assessment, and transition to adult care. Evidence-based advice from international scientific societies is needed.
2022
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11391/1566293
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