Background: Increased age of cancer patients is not an absolute contraindication to pulmonary resection. Different scores have been developed to determine the risk of morbidity and mortality. We have compared four scores in a series of elderly patients with primary or metastatic lung neoplasms who underwent pulmonary resection. Methods: Data from 150 patients with an age equal or more than 75 years were reviewed. Mean age was 78.3 (range, 75-86) years. Based on medical history and preoperative tests 4 predicting scores were calculated. Statistical analysis was performed to identify which score correlates better with postoperative morbidity and mortality. Results: Mortality at 30 days was observed in 3 patients (2%). Postoperative morbidity was observed in 38 patients (25.3%). Univariate analysis showed that risk factors significantly predicting the onset of postoperative complications were type of resection (P=0.02), American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) score (P<0.001) and Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS) (P=0.02). At multivariate analysis smoking and type of resection were significant prognostic factors for both overall and pulmonary morbidity; the ASA score and GPS showed an impact only on overall morbidity. The Cox regression showed significant results for GPS greater than zero and cancer-related death. Age above 80 years was not a negative prognostic factor. A significant difference in terms of 1-year survival was noted in ASA I-II vs. ASA III-IV (90% vs. 78%; P=0.022) and GPS 0 vs. GPS 1 or 2 (90% vs. 77%; P=0.02). Conclusions: Prognostic scores are useful to predict postoperative morbidity and mortality and GPS seems to correlate better with them.

Comparison of preoperative scores predicting outcome in elderly undergoing lung malignancies resection

Vannucci J.;
2020

Abstract

Background: Increased age of cancer patients is not an absolute contraindication to pulmonary resection. Different scores have been developed to determine the risk of morbidity and mortality. We have compared four scores in a series of elderly patients with primary or metastatic lung neoplasms who underwent pulmonary resection. Methods: Data from 150 patients with an age equal or more than 75 years were reviewed. Mean age was 78.3 (range, 75-86) years. Based on medical history and preoperative tests 4 predicting scores were calculated. Statistical analysis was performed to identify which score correlates better with postoperative morbidity and mortality. Results: Mortality at 30 days was observed in 3 patients (2%). Postoperative morbidity was observed in 38 patients (25.3%). Univariate analysis showed that risk factors significantly predicting the onset of postoperative complications were type of resection (P=0.02), American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) score (P<0.001) and Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS) (P=0.02). At multivariate analysis smoking and type of resection were significant prognostic factors for both overall and pulmonary morbidity; the ASA score and GPS showed an impact only on overall morbidity. The Cox regression showed significant results for GPS greater than zero and cancer-related death. Age above 80 years was not a negative prognostic factor. A significant difference in terms of 1-year survival was noted in ASA I-II vs. ASA III-IV (90% vs. 78%; P=0.022) and GPS 0 vs. GPS 1 or 2 (90% vs. 77%; P=0.02). Conclusions: Prognostic scores are useful to predict postoperative morbidity and mortality and GPS seems to correlate better with them.
2020
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11391/1568877
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