Purpose of reviewSchizophrenia-spectrum disorders (SSD) frequently involve symptoms that usually are ascribed to nonpsychotic disorder spectra, such as obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCS). These symptoms can cause differential diagnostic challenges, particularly in early illness stages, and must be considered in treatment planning. In this review, we provide an overview of recent literature within the field of OCS in SSD, with a focus on psychopathology research.Recent findingsOCS are seen in approximately a quarter of patients with SSD or at-risk mental state of psychosis. They are associated with more severe clinical features and specific temporal patterns of OCS may be linked with different clinical trajectories. However, the current definitions of OCS have been criticized for their overinclusive nature, which is a limiting step for differential diagnosis and more precise prognostic stratification. Specific phenomenological features, including a link with experiential anomalies (disorders of basic self), have been suggested to provide clinically relevant distinctions.The presence of OCS in SSD is associated with more severe clinical features and invites a higher clinical attention and perspectival monitoring. Some findings suggest that more fine-grained psychopathological distinctions might be a viable clinical and research strategy to advance the field in the direction of precision psychiatry.

Obsessive-compulsive symptoms in the schizophrenia-spectrum: current developments in psychopathology research

Raballo Andrea
2023

Abstract

Purpose of reviewSchizophrenia-spectrum disorders (SSD) frequently involve symptoms that usually are ascribed to nonpsychotic disorder spectra, such as obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCS). These symptoms can cause differential diagnostic challenges, particularly in early illness stages, and must be considered in treatment planning. In this review, we provide an overview of recent literature within the field of OCS in SSD, with a focus on psychopathology research.Recent findingsOCS are seen in approximately a quarter of patients with SSD or at-risk mental state of psychosis. They are associated with more severe clinical features and specific temporal patterns of OCS may be linked with different clinical trajectories. However, the current definitions of OCS have been criticized for their overinclusive nature, which is a limiting step for differential diagnosis and more precise prognostic stratification. Specific phenomenological features, including a link with experiential anomalies (disorders of basic self), have been suggested to provide clinically relevant distinctions.The presence of OCS in SSD is associated with more severe clinical features and invites a higher clinical attention and perspectival monitoring. Some findings suggest that more fine-grained psychopathological distinctions might be a viable clinical and research strategy to advance the field in the direction of precision psychiatry.
2023
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11391/1574264
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