Objective: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of carotid endarterectomy (CEA) advised little benefit from surgery in women because of high operative risk. Whether these findings are also applicable to carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) is subject of investigation. Our aim was to determine the risk of perioperative and late complications related to CAS and CEA in women. Methods: Data from a single-center carotid surgery database including 1065 individuals with CAS (325 women and 759 men) and 1131 with CEA (325 women and 806 men) were analyzed in a consecutive series of patients. Perioperative risks of death, stroke, and local complications in women undergoing CAS and CEA were compared. Rates of restenosis >50% and stroke at 5 years in symptomatic and asymptomatic women were also assessed. Results: The perioperative risks of stroke or death were no different in women who underwent CAS and CEA women (1.9% vs 3.0%; odds ratio [OR] = 0.63; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.20-1.7; P=.45) whether they were symptomatic or not. Other perioperative complications were also similarly distributed between the two groups of women. Life-table estimates of any periprocedural stroke/death and ipsilateral stroke at 5 years after the procedure did not differ between women with CAS and CEA (4.1% vs 8.1%; P=.18). Five-year rates of restenosis >50% were nonsignificantly higher in women after CEA than after CAS (1.8% vs 8.1%; P=.058). Conclusion: Women with carotid stenosis might have favorable early and late outcomes front CAS with complication rates similar and even lower than those attained with CEA. CAS, performed by trained operators, may be a valid primary choice for treatment of carotid stenosis, particularly in asymptomatic women for whom the risk of surgery seems to be higher. However, before claiming CAS for women, these results need to be confirmed by large RCTs. (J Vase Surg 2010;51:337-44.)

A comparative analysis of the outcomes of carotid stenting and carotid endarterectomy in women.

CIERI, ENRICO
Conceptualization
;
2010

Abstract

Objective: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of carotid endarterectomy (CEA) advised little benefit from surgery in women because of high operative risk. Whether these findings are also applicable to carotid angioplasty and stenting (CAS) is subject of investigation. Our aim was to determine the risk of perioperative and late complications related to CAS and CEA in women. Methods: Data from a single-center carotid surgery database including 1065 individuals with CAS (325 women and 759 men) and 1131 with CEA (325 women and 806 men) were analyzed in a consecutive series of patients. Perioperative risks of death, stroke, and local complications in women undergoing CAS and CEA were compared. Rates of restenosis >50% and stroke at 5 years in symptomatic and asymptomatic women were also assessed. Results: The perioperative risks of stroke or death were no different in women who underwent CAS and CEA women (1.9% vs 3.0%; odds ratio [OR] = 0.63; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.20-1.7; P=.45) whether they were symptomatic or not. Other perioperative complications were also similarly distributed between the two groups of women. Life-table estimates of any periprocedural stroke/death and ipsilateral stroke at 5 years after the procedure did not differ between women with CAS and CEA (4.1% vs 8.1%; P=.18). Five-year rates of restenosis >50% were nonsignificantly higher in women after CEA than after CAS (1.8% vs 8.1%; P=.058). Conclusion: Women with carotid stenosis might have favorable early and late outcomes front CAS with complication rates similar and even lower than those attained with CEA. CAS, performed by trained operators, may be a valid primary choice for treatment of carotid stenosis, particularly in asymptomatic women for whom the risk of surgery seems to be higher. However, before claiming CAS for women, these results need to be confirmed by large RCTs. (J Vase Surg 2010;51:337-44.)
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11391/167050
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 2
  • Scopus 14
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 14
social impact