High levels of serum and/or plasma circulating DNA (cDNA) have been described in patients with systemic autoimmune diseases (SADs). However, the role of this molecule has not been clarified. Our aim was to evaluate plasma cDNA levels in 48 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and 44 primary Sjögren's syndrome (SS) patients, as compared with healthy and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) subjects, and to analyse their correlation with disease activity, disease damage and clinical manifestations. Plasma DNA was extracted using Qiagen columns and quantified by real-time quantitative PCR. Disease activity and damage were evaluated in both diseases by analysis of clinical and laboratory findings. Our results showed that plasma cDNA levels were significantly higher in patients with SS (mean ± SE: 32.0 ± 7.3 ng/ml) and with SLE (35.0 ± 9.0 ng/ml) than in controls (5.1 ± 1.1 ng/ml) (p < 0.0001 for both). Disease activity index correlated with cDNA levels in SS (p = 0.02), but not in SLE, and SS subjects with active disease displayed significantly higher cDNA levels with respect to inactive patients (p < 0.05). No correlation was found between plasma cDNA levels and disease damage indexes in either SLE or SS. These results indicate that increased plasma cDNA levels can been demonstrated in SLE and in SS patients with respect to healthy subjects. Interestingly, although cDNA levels did not correlate with indexes of disease damage in these disorders, a significant correlation between cDNA concentrations and disease activity was observed in SS, but not in SLE, suggesting a possible role of cDNA as non-invasive marker of disease activity. The different results obtained in these SADs may be explained by distinct disease pathogenesis or the influence of immunosuppressive and corticosteroid therapy that, unlike in SS, is usually employed in SLE.

Increased levels of circulating DNA in patients with connective tissue diseases: a possible marker of disease activity in Sjögren’s syndrome

BARTOLONI BOCCI, Elena;ALUNNO, ALESSIA;CRINO', Lucio;GERLI, Roberto
2011

Abstract

High levels of serum and/or plasma circulating DNA (cDNA) have been described in patients with systemic autoimmune diseases (SADs). However, the role of this molecule has not been clarified. Our aim was to evaluate plasma cDNA levels in 48 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and 44 primary Sjögren's syndrome (SS) patients, as compared with healthy and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) subjects, and to analyse their correlation with disease activity, disease damage and clinical manifestations. Plasma DNA was extracted using Qiagen columns and quantified by real-time quantitative PCR. Disease activity and damage were evaluated in both diseases by analysis of clinical and laboratory findings. Our results showed that plasma cDNA levels were significantly higher in patients with SS (mean ± SE: 32.0 ± 7.3 ng/ml) and with SLE (35.0 ± 9.0 ng/ml) than in controls (5.1 ± 1.1 ng/ml) (p < 0.0001 for both). Disease activity index correlated with cDNA levels in SS (p = 0.02), but not in SLE, and SS subjects with active disease displayed significantly higher cDNA levels with respect to inactive patients (p < 0.05). No correlation was found between plasma cDNA levels and disease damage indexes in either SLE or SS. These results indicate that increased plasma cDNA levels can been demonstrated in SLE and in SS patients with respect to healthy subjects. Interestingly, although cDNA levels did not correlate with indexes of disease damage in these disorders, a significant correlation between cDNA concentrations and disease activity was observed in SS, but not in SLE, suggesting a possible role of cDNA as non-invasive marker of disease activity. The different results obtained in these SADs may be explained by distinct disease pathogenesis or the influence of immunosuppressive and corticosteroid therapy that, unlike in SS, is usually employed in SLE.
2011
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11391/175805
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