Background. Design of cemented hip and knee implants, oriented to improve the longevity of artificial joints, is largely based on numerical models. The static coefficient of friction between the implant and the bone cement is necessary to characterize the interface conditions in these models and must be accurately provided. The measurement of this coefficient using a repeatable and reproducible methodology for materials used in total hip arthroplasty is missing from the literature. Methods. A micro-topographic surface analysis characterized the surfaces of the specimens used in the experiments. The coefficient of friction between stainless steel and bone cement in dry and wet conditions using bovine serum was determined using a prototype computerized sliding friction tester. The effects of surface roughness (polished versus matt) and of contact pressure on the coefficient of friction have also been investigated. Findings. The serum influences little the coefficient of friction for the matt steel surface, where the mechanical interactions due to higher roughness are still the most relevant factor. However, for polished steel surfaces, the restraining effect of proteins plays a very relevant role in increasing the coefficient of friction. Interpretation. When the coefficient of friction is used in finite element analysis, it is used for the debonded stem–cement situation. It can thus be assumed that serum will propagate between the stem and the cement mantle. The authors believe that the use of a static coefficient of friction of 0.3–0.4, measured in the present study, is appropriate in finite element models.

Static Coefficient of Friction Between Stainless Steel and PMMA Used in Cemented Hip Implants

SENIN, Nicola
2006

Abstract

Background. Design of cemented hip and knee implants, oriented to improve the longevity of artificial joints, is largely based on numerical models. The static coefficient of friction between the implant and the bone cement is necessary to characterize the interface conditions in these models and must be accurately provided. The measurement of this coefficient using a repeatable and reproducible methodology for materials used in total hip arthroplasty is missing from the literature. Methods. A micro-topographic surface analysis characterized the surfaces of the specimens used in the experiments. The coefficient of friction between stainless steel and bone cement in dry and wet conditions using bovine serum was determined using a prototype computerized sliding friction tester. The effects of surface roughness (polished versus matt) and of contact pressure on the coefficient of friction have also been investigated. Findings. The serum influences little the coefficient of friction for the matt steel surface, where the mechanical interactions due to higher roughness are still the most relevant factor. However, for polished steel surfaces, the restraining effect of proteins plays a very relevant role in increasing the coefficient of friction. Interpretation. When the coefficient of friction is used in finite element analysis, it is used for the debonded stem–cement situation. It can thus be assumed that serum will propagate between the stem and the cement mantle. The authors believe that the use of a static coefficient of friction of 0.3–0.4, measured in the present study, is appropriate in finite element models.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11391/42357
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