Background: Diabetes is prevalent in most patients undergoing carotid revascularization and is suggested as a marker of poor outcome after carotid endarterectomy (CEA). Data on outcome of diabetic patients undergoing carotid artery stenting (CAS) are limited. The aim of this study was to investigate early and 6-year outcomes of diabetic patients undergoing carotid revascularization with CAS and CEA. Methods: The database of patients undergoing carotid revascularization for primary carotid stenosis was queried from 2001 to 2009. Diabetic patients were defined as those with established diagnosis and/or receiving oral hypoglycemic or insulin therapy. Multivariate and Kaplan-Meier analyses, stratified by type of treatment, were performed on perioperative (30 days) and late outcomes. Results: A total of 2196 procedures, 1116 by CEA and 1080 by CAS (29% female, mean age 71.3 years), were reviewed. Diabetes was prevalent in 630 (28.7%). Diabetic patients were younger (P < .0001) and frequently had hypertension (P = .018) or coronary disease (P = .019). Perioperative stroke/death rate was 2.7% (17/630) in diabetic patients vs 2.3% (36/1566) in nondiabetic, (P = .64); the rate was 3.4% in diabetic CEA group and 2.1% in diabetic CAS group (P = .46). At multivariate analyses, diabetes was a predictor of perioperative stroke/death in the CEA group (odds ratio [OR], 2.83; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05-7.61; P = .04) but not in the CAS group (P = .72). Six-year survival was 76.0% in diabetics and 80.8% in nondiabetics (P = .15). Six-year late stroke estimates were 3.2% in diabetic and 4.6% in noncliabetic patients (P = .90). The 6-year risk of restenosis was similar (4.6% % vs 4.2%) in diabetic and nondiabetic patients (P = .56). Survival, late stroke, and restenosis rates between diabetics and nondiabetics were similar in CAS and CEA groups. Conclusions: Diabetic patients are not at greater risk of perioperative morbidity and mortality or late stroke after CAS, however, the perioperative risk can be higher after CEA. This may help in selecting the appropriate technique for carotid revascularization in patients best suited for the type of procedure. (J Vase Surg 2012;55:79-89.)

Diabetes is not a predictor of outcome for carotid revascularization with stenting as it may be for carotid endarterectomy

CIERI, ENRICO
Conceptualization
;
2012

Abstract

Background: Diabetes is prevalent in most patients undergoing carotid revascularization and is suggested as a marker of poor outcome after carotid endarterectomy (CEA). Data on outcome of diabetic patients undergoing carotid artery stenting (CAS) are limited. The aim of this study was to investigate early and 6-year outcomes of diabetic patients undergoing carotid revascularization with CAS and CEA. Methods: The database of patients undergoing carotid revascularization for primary carotid stenosis was queried from 2001 to 2009. Diabetic patients were defined as those with established diagnosis and/or receiving oral hypoglycemic or insulin therapy. Multivariate and Kaplan-Meier analyses, stratified by type of treatment, were performed on perioperative (30 days) and late outcomes. Results: A total of 2196 procedures, 1116 by CEA and 1080 by CAS (29% female, mean age 71.3 years), were reviewed. Diabetes was prevalent in 630 (28.7%). Diabetic patients were younger (P < .0001) and frequently had hypertension (P = .018) or coronary disease (P = .019). Perioperative stroke/death rate was 2.7% (17/630) in diabetic patients vs 2.3% (36/1566) in nondiabetic, (P = .64); the rate was 3.4% in diabetic CEA group and 2.1% in diabetic CAS group (P = .46). At multivariate analyses, diabetes was a predictor of perioperative stroke/death in the CEA group (odds ratio [OR], 2.83; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05-7.61; P = .04) but not in the CAS group (P = .72). Six-year survival was 76.0% in diabetics and 80.8% in nondiabetics (P = .15). Six-year late stroke estimates were 3.2% in diabetic and 4.6% in noncliabetic patients (P = .90). The 6-year risk of restenosis was similar (4.6% % vs 4.2%) in diabetic and nondiabetic patients (P = .56). Survival, late stroke, and restenosis rates between diabetics and nondiabetics were similar in CAS and CEA groups. Conclusions: Diabetic patients are not at greater risk of perioperative morbidity and mortality or late stroke after CAS, however, the perioperative risk can be higher after CEA. This may help in selecting the appropriate technique for carotid revascularization in patients best suited for the type of procedure. (J Vase Surg 2012;55:79-89.)
2012
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11391/543898
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