In an attempt to obtain site-specific delivery of 5-ASA in the intestinal tract, we have determined the extent of absorption and metabolism of a number of novel 5-ASA derivatives, namely, (N-L-glutamyl)-amino-2-salicylic acid (1), (N-L-aspartyl)-amino-2-salicylic-acid (2), 5-aminosalicyl-L-proline-L-leucine (3), and 5-(N-L-glutamyl)-aminosalicyl-L-proline-L-leucine (4), which are selectively cleaved by intestinal brush border aminopeptidase A and carboxypeptidases. These novel prodrugs, 5-ASA, and sulfasalazine were administered to adult Fisher rats (N = 30) and to animals that had undergone prior colostomy (N = 30). Urine and feces were collected at timed intervals for 48 hr and the metabolites, 5-ASA, and N-acetyl-5-ASA were measured by highperformance liquid chromatography. The absorption and metabolism of all compounds were essentially identical in colostomized and normal animals. 5-ASA exhibited a rapid proximal intestinal absorption as evidenced by the high cumulative urinary excretion (>65%) and low fecal excretion. Sulfasalazine, as expected, exhibited a lower urinary recovery (<35%) and higher fecal excretion of 5-ASA and its metabolite. The novel glutamate and aspartate derivatives (1 and 2) behaved similarly to sulfasalazine, while administration of the proline-leucine derivative (3) resulted in urinary and fecal recovery values intermediate with respect to those observed with 5-ASA and sulfasalazine. 5-(NL-Glutamyl)-aminosalicyl-L-proline-L-leucine yielded the highest fecal recovery of 5-ASA and its N-acetyl derivative, indicating a more efficient delivery to the distal bowel. Amino acid derivatives of 5-ASA appear to be potentially useful prodrugs for the site-specific delivery of 5-ASA to different regions of the intestinal tract.

AMINO-ACID DERIVATIVES OF 5-ASA AS NOVEL PRODRUGS FOR INTESTINAL DRUG-DELIVERY

NATALINI, Benedetto;PELLICCIARI, Roberto;
1994-01-01

Abstract

In an attempt to obtain site-specific delivery of 5-ASA in the intestinal tract, we have determined the extent of absorption and metabolism of a number of novel 5-ASA derivatives, namely, (N-L-glutamyl)-amino-2-salicylic acid (1), (N-L-aspartyl)-amino-2-salicylic-acid (2), 5-aminosalicyl-L-proline-L-leucine (3), and 5-(N-L-glutamyl)-aminosalicyl-L-proline-L-leucine (4), which are selectively cleaved by intestinal brush border aminopeptidase A and carboxypeptidases. These novel prodrugs, 5-ASA, and sulfasalazine were administered to adult Fisher rats (N = 30) and to animals that had undergone prior colostomy (N = 30). Urine and feces were collected at timed intervals for 48 hr and the metabolites, 5-ASA, and N-acetyl-5-ASA were measured by highperformance liquid chromatography. The absorption and metabolism of all compounds were essentially identical in colostomized and normal animals. 5-ASA exhibited a rapid proximal intestinal absorption as evidenced by the high cumulative urinary excretion (>65%) and low fecal excretion. Sulfasalazine, as expected, exhibited a lower urinary recovery (<35%) and higher fecal excretion of 5-ASA and its metabolite. The novel glutamate and aspartate derivatives (1 and 2) behaved similarly to sulfasalazine, while administration of the proline-leucine derivative (3) resulted in urinary and fecal recovery values intermediate with respect to those observed with 5-ASA and sulfasalazine. 5-(NL-Glutamyl)-aminosalicyl-L-proline-L-leucine yielded the highest fecal recovery of 5-ASA and its N-acetyl derivative, indicating a more efficient delivery to the distal bowel. Amino acid derivatives of 5-ASA appear to be potentially useful prodrugs for the site-specific delivery of 5-ASA to different regions of the intestinal tract.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11391/914157
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