Listeria monocytogenes has been referred to as a concern microorganism in cheese making due to its ability to survive and grow in a wide range of environmental conditions, such as refrigeration temperatures, low pH and high salt concentration at the end of the production process. Since cheese may be a potential hazard for consumers, especially high-risk consumers (e.g., pregnant, young children, the elderly, people with medical conditions), efforts of the dairy industry have been aimed at investigating new conservation techniques based on natural additives to meet consumers’ demands on less processed foods without compromising the food safety. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of Myrtus communis L. (myrtle) and Rosmarinus officinalis L. (rosemary) essential oils (EO) against Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 679 spiked in sheep cheese before ripening. After the cheesemaking process, the samples were stored at 8 C for 2 h, 1 d, 3 d, 14 d and 28 d. The composition of EO was identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. Constituents such as 1,8-cineole, limonene, methyl-eugenol, -pinene, -terpineol, -terpinolene and -pinene were present in both EO, accounting for 44.61% and 39.76% from the total of chemical compounds identified for myrtle and rosemary EO, respectively. According to the chemical classification, both EO were mainly composed of monoterpenes. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against L. monocytogenes was obtained at 31.25 L/mL to myrtle EO and at 0.40 L/mL to rosemary EO. Then, cheeses were inoculated with L. monocytogenes (Ca. 6 log CFU/mL) and EO was added at MIC value. The addition of rosemary and myrtle EO displayed lower counts of L. monocytogenes (p < 0.01) (about 1–2 log CFU/g) during the ripening period compared to control samples. Ripening only influences (p < 0.001) the growth of L. monocytogenes in control samples. Since rosemary and myrtle EO do not exert any negative impact on the growth of native microflora (p > 0.05), their use as natural antimicrobial additives in cheese demonstrated a potential for dairy processors to assure safety against L. monocytogenes.

Antimicrobial Activity of Myrtus communis L. and Rosmarinus officinalis L. Essential Oils against Listeria monocytogenes in Cheese

Beniamino Cenci-Goga;Luca Grispoldi;
2021

Abstract

Listeria monocytogenes has been referred to as a concern microorganism in cheese making due to its ability to survive and grow in a wide range of environmental conditions, such as refrigeration temperatures, low pH and high salt concentration at the end of the production process. Since cheese may be a potential hazard for consumers, especially high-risk consumers (e.g., pregnant, young children, the elderly, people with medical conditions), efforts of the dairy industry have been aimed at investigating new conservation techniques based on natural additives to meet consumers’ demands on less processed foods without compromising the food safety. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of Myrtus communis L. (myrtle) and Rosmarinus officinalis L. (rosemary) essential oils (EO) against Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 679 spiked in sheep cheese before ripening. After the cheesemaking process, the samples were stored at 8 C for 2 h, 1 d, 3 d, 14 d and 28 d. The composition of EO was identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis. Constituents such as 1,8-cineole, limonene, methyl-eugenol, -pinene, -terpineol, -terpinolene and -pinene were present in both EO, accounting for 44.61% and 39.76% from the total of chemical compounds identified for myrtle and rosemary EO, respectively. According to the chemical classification, both EO were mainly composed of monoterpenes. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against L. monocytogenes was obtained at 31.25 L/mL to myrtle EO and at 0.40 L/mL to rosemary EO. Then, cheeses were inoculated with L. monocytogenes (Ca. 6 log CFU/mL) and EO was added at MIC value. The addition of rosemary and myrtle EO displayed lower counts of L. monocytogenes (p < 0.01) (about 1–2 log CFU/g) during the ripening period compared to control samples. Ripening only influences (p < 0.001) the growth of L. monocytogenes in control samples. Since rosemary and myrtle EO do not exert any negative impact on the growth of native microflora (p > 0.05), their use as natural antimicrobial additives in cheese demonstrated a potential for dairy processors to assure safety against L. monocytogenes.
2021
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11391/1493620
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 22
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 20
social impact